Monthly Archives: August 2010

When a Rainbow Welcomes you Home!

When I arrived home tonight, this was my view. Our pond with a beautiful rainbow over it. I know the colors of the rainbow are not that strong…there is, however, something magical about them. I just had to share…

Rainbow over our pond

Sometimes, we get so busy with our lives that we forget about the simple (and free) wonders mother nature brings our way.

I love rainbows and I’m grateful this one welcomed me home tonight. What are you grateful for, today?

Remembering Hurricane Katrina: 5 Years Ago Today

Today is my husband’s birthday and this is how I never forget the day Katrina hit and ravaged Louisiana 5 years ago today.

Hurricane Katrina August 28th, 2005

At it strongest, Katrina was a category 5 hurricane with sustained winds up to 175 MPH. At the time, Katrina was the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. She was surpassed by Rita, which also hit Louisiana’s coast less than a month later.

When Katrina hit Louisiana and the city of New Orleans, it was a category 3 hurricane with sustained winds of 125 MPH.

I’m sure most of us remember the devastation that captured our media for days afterward.

Flooded New Orleans after Katrina in 2005

 

New Orleans being below sea level and built somewhat like a bowl, retained the flood waters for days leaving thousands of people trapped in its path.

What I remember vividly about Katrina is the government’s incompetence before, during, and after the ordeal. Here is Lew Rockwell on the one event I was never able to forget:

“Perhaps the most astounding case of incompetence has received the least attention. It relates to a 500-boat flotilla stretching over 5 miles that left for New Orleans from Acadiana Mall in Lafayette. It involved 1,000 people who had hoped to rescue hospital patients and take them to safety. It consisted of private boaters, fishermen, hunters, and others who had spent their entire lives navigating Louisiana waterways.

“Once this caravan arrived, they were turned away by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, which was now being run by FEMA. All five hundred boats were turned away and ordered out.

“Now keep in mind that this was three days after the hurricane hit. There were hundreds of people inside the Charity Hospital in New Orleans alone. They had no supplies and only three had been rescued. At this very time, the head of the FEMA-ized Wildlife and Fisheries Department announced to the world on television that it needed no help from anyone and that it had all matters under control.” For the rest Rockwell’s article, click here.

I knew some of these boaters and all they wanted to do was help their fellow citizens. Another friend of mine, who was a student at LSU’s medical school at the time, managed to rescue about a hundred people the day before with his boat and the help of a friend. He, too, was ordered out of the waters because he wasn’t a “government official.” Imagine what 500 boats could have accomplished!

What is your Katrina story? What do you remember most about the infamous storm and the days that followed?

Interested in a Career in Real Estate?

If you are interested in a career in real estate and are not sure where to start, come to career night this coming Wednesday, September 1st, in Lafayette.This is a free, informative session on what it takes to become a real estate professional and what it take to be successful once you have your license.

If you’re already in the process of obtaining your license or you have completed it and are not sure which company offers the best opportunity, this seminar is a great way to learn about Keller Williams and what our company has to offer.

If you do not live in the Lafayette area, contact me and I will put you in touch with an office near you.

Real estate career night lafayette, LA

My book is out: An Essay on Economic Theory

“An Essay on Economic Theory,” a new translation of Richard Cantillon’s “Essai sur la nature du commerce en général” is hot off the press! The text was actually written in the early 1700s and first published in 1755. Mark Thornton, of the Mises Institute, and I worked on a new translation of the book. It was a long, arduous process but we did it. The book is now available from the Mises Institute.

An Essay on Economic Theory

Here is part of the description for this new publication:

“At last, and finally, here is the first accurate and beautiful translation of Richard Cantillon’s 1755 masterpiece on economics. This treatise is widely credited with being the first to describe the market process as one driven by entrepreneurship. William Stanley Jevons, in the first blush of discovery, proclaimed Cantillon’s Essai, “the cradle of political economy.”

(…)

“Mark Thornton and Chantal Saucier have accomplished the arduous task of bringing forth a new and improved translation of Cantillon’s famous work. Heretofore the only English translation of the Essai available has been the 1931 edition produced by Henry Higgs for the Royal Economic Society. Though competent, it has become less serviceable over time, as more and more of its shortcomings devolved (not the least of which is the antiquated use of “undertaker” in place of “entrepreneur”).

“Saucier provides a more accurate and lucid account, better suited to the 21st century. Thornton’s hand shows not only in competent guidance of the translator but in the inclusion of numerous explanatory footnotes that add historical context.”

It is probably fair to say that Cantillon was also the “the father of enterprise economics.” As Realtors, we are all entrepreneurs and as such, it is important that we understand these principles. This book is a great place to start!

Monthly Archives: August 2010

When a Rainbow Welcomes you Home!

When I arrived home tonight, this was my view. Our pond with a beautiful rainbow over it. I know the colors of the rainbow are not that strong…there is, however, something magical about them. I just had to share…

Rainbow over our pond

Sometimes, we get so busy with our lives that we forget about the simple (and free) wonders mother nature brings our way.

I love rainbows and I’m grateful this one welcomed me home tonight. What are you grateful for, today?

Remembering Hurricane Katrina: 5 Years Ago Today

Today is my husband’s birthday and this is how I never forget the day Katrina hit and ravaged Louisiana 5 years ago today.

Hurricane Katrina August 28th, 2005

At it strongest, Katrina was a category 5 hurricane with sustained winds up to 175 MPH. At the time, Katrina was the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. She was surpassed by Rita, which also hit Louisiana’s coast less than a month later.

When Katrina hit Louisiana and the city of New Orleans, it was a category 3 hurricane with sustained winds of 125 MPH.

I’m sure most of us remember the devastation that captured our media for days afterward.

Flooded New Orleans after Katrina in 2005

 

New Orleans being below sea level and built somewhat like a bowl, retained the flood waters for days leaving thousands of people trapped in its path.

What I remember vividly about Katrina is the government’s incompetence before, during, and after the ordeal. Here is Lew Rockwell on the one event I was never able to forget:

“Perhaps the most astounding case of incompetence has received the least attention. It relates to a 500-boat flotilla stretching over 5 miles that left for New Orleans from Acadiana Mall in Lafayette. It involved 1,000 people who had hoped to rescue hospital patients and take them to safety. It consisted of private boaters, fishermen, hunters, and others who had spent their entire lives navigating Louisiana waterways.

“Once this caravan arrived, they were turned away by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, which was now being run by FEMA. All five hundred boats were turned away and ordered out.

“Now keep in mind that this was three days after the hurricane hit. There were hundreds of people inside the Charity Hospital in New Orleans alone. They had no supplies and only three had been rescued. At this very time, the head of the FEMA-ized Wildlife and Fisheries Department announced to the world on television that it needed no help from anyone and that it had all matters under control.” For the rest Rockwell’s article, click here.

I knew some of these boaters and all they wanted to do was help their fellow citizens. Another friend of mine, who was a student at LSU’s medical school at the time, managed to rescue about a hundred people the day before with his boat and the help of a friend. He, too, was ordered out of the waters because he wasn’t a “government official.” Imagine what 500 boats could have accomplished!

What is your Katrina story? What do you remember most about the infamous storm and the days that followed?

Interested in a Career in Real Estate?

If you are interested in a career in real estate and are not sure where to start, come to career night this coming Wednesday, September 1st, in Lafayette.This is a free, informative session on what it takes to become a real estate professional and what it take to be successful once you have your license.

If you’re already in the process of obtaining your license or you have completed it and are not sure which company offers the best opportunity, this seminar is a great way to learn about Keller Williams and what our company has to offer.

If you do not live in the Lafayette area, contact me and I will put you in touch with an office near you.

Real estate career night lafayette, LA

My book is out: An Essay on Economic Theory

“An Essay on Economic Theory,” a new translation of Richard Cantillon’s “Essai sur la nature du commerce en général” is hot off the press! The text was actually written in the early 1700s and first published in 1755. Mark Thornton, of the Mises Institute, and I worked on a new translation of the book. It was a long, arduous process but we did it. The book is now available from the Mises Institute.

An Essay on Economic Theory

Here is part of the description for this new publication:

“At last, and finally, here is the first accurate and beautiful translation of Richard Cantillon’s 1755 masterpiece on economics. This treatise is widely credited with being the first to describe the market process as one driven by entrepreneurship. William Stanley Jevons, in the first blush of discovery, proclaimed Cantillon’s Essai, “the cradle of political economy.”

(…)

“Mark Thornton and Chantal Saucier have accomplished the arduous task of bringing forth a new and improved translation of Cantillon’s famous work. Heretofore the only English translation of the Essai available has been the 1931 edition produced by Henry Higgs for the Royal Economic Society. Though competent, it has become less serviceable over time, as more and more of its shortcomings devolved (not the least of which is the antiquated use of “undertaker” in place of “entrepreneur”).

“Saucier provides a more accurate and lucid account, better suited to the 21st century. Thornton’s hand shows not only in competent guidance of the translator but in the inclusion of numerous explanatory footnotes that add historical context.”

It is probably fair to say that Cantillon was also the “the father of enterprise economics.” As Realtors, we are all entrepreneurs and as such, it is important that we understand these principles. This book is a great place to start!