Monthly Archives: February 2016

How to Use Personal Hotspot for iPhone

new tech tuesday logo

When you’re in a bind and need an internet connection for your laptop, look no further than your iPhone. Using the Personal Hotspot feature in iOS, you can share your iPhone’s internet connection with other devices by way of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or even USB.

Although you only need iOS 7 or above on your iPhone, the feature is carrier-specific. Fortunately, most carriers do support it, and you can use this Apple Support page for more information on specific wireless carrier features. However, your specific wireless plan may not include Personal Hotspot, so you’ll need to contact your carrier to see how you can get it.

It’s also recommended that you have an unlimited data plan if you want to use this feature, as it can eat up tons of data in no time. Then again, if you only use hotspot when in a bind, you should be okay as long as you monitor how much data you use.

Enable Personal Hotspot

Head into your iPhone’s Settings and select Personal Hotspot. (If you don’t see it listed on the main Settings page, select Cellular instead; you’ll see an option to set it up, which may require contacting your carrier.) In your Personal Hotspot settings, toggle it on, then decide how you want to connect the other device.

personal hotspotConnecting via Wi-Fi

The Wi-Fi option is the probably the easiest one to use. After toggling on Personal Hotspot, create a Wi-Fi password. The password must be eight digits long and include only ASCII characters (English letters, numbers 0-9, and some punctuation). Otherwise, the device attempting to connect to the hotspot will not be able to.

With Personal Hotspot enabled and your password created, your iPhone will be discoverable to nearby devices—just select your iPhone and enter the password to connect.

If you utilize Continuity on a Mac, then you can take advantage of Instant Hotspot, which essentially means that you won’t have to enter in the password.

Connecting via Bluetooth

In order to use the Bluetooth method, make sure that the two devices both have Bluetooth enabled. Within the Bluetooth settings on your iPhone, scan and select the targeted device. Once they’re paired, the other device will have access to the internet.

You will know that the connection was successful because the status bar turns blue on your iPhone.

Connecting with USB

Using the USB cable that came with your iPhone, connect to your Mac or PC. Head into the network preferences on your computer and select your iPhone from the list presented. If you’re using a Mac, the preferences will look like the screenshot below—just select your device and click “Apply.”

Regardless of your preferred method of connectivity, be sure to limit which Mac apps can and can’t use data when tethering to your mobile hotspot, which can save you data if you’re not on an unlimited plan.

A Little Something Extra

motivational monday logo

Happy Leap Day!  And what a special day it is.  What makes it so special, you may ask.  It’s just another day—a Monday, no less.

leap-frogsLeap Day can be a very special day, indeed.  It all depends on how you look at it.  You can treat it as any other day, or you can treat it as an extra day with extra opportunities!  This day only comes once every four years; why not make the best of it?

Put in a little extra effort to smile and be productive.  Spend a little extra time with your loved ones.  Buy a little something extra, just for yourself.  And remember that this day, just like every other day, is a gift!

What will you do with your extra day?

 

How to Grow Mushrooms

growing mushrooms

There’s no need to be in the dark about growing mushrooms. These tasty chameleons of the food world are fat-free, low in calories, and filled with vitamins, antioxidants, and other nutrients.

The keys to growing mushrooms at home are establishing the right growing conditions and acquiring or making mushroom spawn, which is the material used to propagate mushrooms.

How Mushrooms Grow

Mushrooms grow from spores — not seeds — that are so tiny you can’t see individual spores with the naked eye.

Because the spores don’t contain chlorophyll to begin germinating (as seeds do), they rely on substances such as sawdust, grain, wooden plugs, straw, wood chips, or liquid for nourishment. A blend of the spores and these nutrients is called spawn. Spawn performs a bit like the starter needed to make sourdough bread.

The spawn supports the growth of mushrooms’ tiny, white, threadlike roots, called mycelium. The mycelium grows first, before anything that resembles a mushroom pushes through the growing medium.

The spawn itself could grow mushrooms, but you’ll get a lot better mushroom harvest when the spawn is applied to a substrate, or growing medium. Depending on the mushroom type, the substrate might be straw, cardboard, logs, wood chips, or compost with a blend of materials such as straw, corncobs, cotton and cocoa seed hulls, gypsum, and nitrogen supplements.

Where to Grow Mushrooms

Mushrooms prefer dark, cool, moist, and humid growing environments. In a house, a basement is often ideal, but a spot under the sink may be all you need.

Test the proposed location by checking the temperature. Most mushrooms grow best in temperatures between 55 and 60 degrees F, away from drying, direct heat and drafts. Enoki mushrooms prefer cooler temperatures, about 45 degrees F. Many basements are too warm in summer to grow mushrooms, so you might consider growing mushrooms as a winter project.

Mushrooms can tolerate some light, but the spot you choose should stay relatively dark or in low light.

Some mushroom types grow outdoors in prepared ground or logs, a process that takes much longer (six months to three years) than in controlled environments inside.

Types of Mushrooms to Grow

There are many kinds of mushrooms. One of the beauties of growing your own instead of wild-harvesting them is that you can be sure you’re not picking a poisonous mushroom.

mushroom types

These mushrooms are the types most commonly grown at home:

  • Crimini
  • Enoki
  • Maitake
  • Portobello
  • Oyster
  • Shiitake
  • White button

Each type has specific growing needs. Grow white button mushrooms on composted manure, shiitakes on wood or hardwood sawdust, and oyster mushrooms on straw, for example.

Growing Mushrooms

If you are growing mushrooms in your home, you have a couple of options for materials.

You can buy mushroom kits already packed with a growing medium that’s inoculated with mushroom spawn. Buying a kit is a good way to begin your knowledge of mushroom growing. If you start without a kit, the type of mushroom you choose to grow determines the substrate you grow the mushrooms on. Research each mushroom’s needs.

button mushrooms

Button mushrooms are among the easiest types to grow. Use 14 x 16 inch trays about 6 inches deep that resemble seed flats. Fill the trays with the mushroom compost material and inoculate with spawn.

Use a heating pad to raise the soil temperature to about 70 degrees F for about three weeks or until you see the mycelium — the tiny, threadlike roots. At this point, drop the temperature to 55 to 60 degrees F. Cover the spawn with an inch or so of potting soil.

Keep the soil moist by spritzing it with water and covering it with a damp cloth that you can spritz with water as it dries.

Button mushrooms should appear within three to four weeks. Harvest them when the caps open and the stalk can be cut with a sharp knife from the stem. Avoid pulling up the mushrooms, or you risk damage to surrounding fungi that are still developing. Harvesting every day should result in a continuous crop for about six months.

Eat Lafayette – Gator Cove

gator cove

If you are looking for a restaurant that perfectly captures the taste and feel of South Louisiana, you have to check out Gator Cove! Gator Cove is 100% Louisiana, combining delicious Cajun food with an exciting atmosphere filled with gators, deer and peacocks. Gator Cove gives its patrons a taste of what Cajun country really is.

The building in which Gator Cove resides was initially built in the early 80s as a garage.  Aubrey and Bonnie Henderson built the garage to house their Bluebird bus; however, the screeching of metal upon metal as Mr. Henderson tried to park the bus proved that the garage wasn’t tall enough for the bus.

The Hendersons had to find a new purpose for their garage.  Since they already owned a barbecue lodge, they decided to expand their business.  In 1982, Gator Cove was opened up in the Henderson’s garage.  Since then, both the building and the menu have grown to accommodate larger and larger crowds hungry for some Cajun cookin’.

As a homestyle restaurant, Gator Cove caters to all things Louisiana, specializing in barbecue, fresh seafood, crawfish, succulent steaks, po’ boys, and more! The menu has something to please the entire family, including plate lunches, children’s dishes, and an assortment of delicious desserts. A full catering menu and party rooms are also available for those hosting parties or other special events.

Gator Cove, like all local seafood restaurants, is booming with business this crawfish season, but mud bugs aren’t the only thing bringing in customers.  It’s the entire Cajun menu, the fun and welcoming atmosphere, and the friendly service that Gator Cove has to offer.  Stop by for lunch or dinner and see what Gator Cove has in store for you!

Monthly Archives: February 2016

How to Use Personal Hotspot for iPhone

new tech tuesday logo

When you’re in a bind and need an internet connection for your laptop, look no further than your iPhone. Using the Personal Hotspot feature in iOS, you can share your iPhone’s internet connection with other devices by way of Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, or even USB.

Although you only need iOS 7 or above on your iPhone, the feature is carrier-specific. Fortunately, most carriers do support it, and you can use this Apple Support page for more information on specific wireless carrier features. However, your specific wireless plan may not include Personal Hotspot, so you’ll need to contact your carrier to see how you can get it.

It’s also recommended that you have an unlimited data plan if you want to use this feature, as it can eat up tons of data in no time. Then again, if you only use hotspot when in a bind, you should be okay as long as you monitor how much data you use.

Enable Personal Hotspot

Head into your iPhone’s Settings and select Personal Hotspot. (If you don’t see it listed on the main Settings page, select Cellular instead; you’ll see an option to set it up, which may require contacting your carrier.) In your Personal Hotspot settings, toggle it on, then decide how you want to connect the other device.

personal hotspotConnecting via Wi-Fi

The Wi-Fi option is the probably the easiest one to use. After toggling on Personal Hotspot, create a Wi-Fi password. The password must be eight digits long and include only ASCII characters (English letters, numbers 0-9, and some punctuation). Otherwise, the device attempting to connect to the hotspot will not be able to.

With Personal Hotspot enabled and your password created, your iPhone will be discoverable to nearby devices—just select your iPhone and enter the password to connect.

If you utilize Continuity on a Mac, then you can take advantage of Instant Hotspot, which essentially means that you won’t have to enter in the password.

Connecting via Bluetooth

In order to use the Bluetooth method, make sure that the two devices both have Bluetooth enabled. Within the Bluetooth settings on your iPhone, scan and select the targeted device. Once they’re paired, the other device will have access to the internet.

You will know that the connection was successful because the status bar turns blue on your iPhone.

Connecting with USB

Using the USB cable that came with your iPhone, connect to your Mac or PC. Head into the network preferences on your computer and select your iPhone from the list presented. If you’re using a Mac, the preferences will look like the screenshot below—just select your device and click “Apply.”

Regardless of your preferred method of connectivity, be sure to limit which Mac apps can and can’t use data when tethering to your mobile hotspot, which can save you data if you’re not on an unlimited plan.

A Little Something Extra

motivational monday logo

Happy Leap Day!  And what a special day it is.  What makes it so special, you may ask.  It’s just another day—a Monday, no less.

leap-frogsLeap Day can be a very special day, indeed.  It all depends on how you look at it.  You can treat it as any other day, or you can treat it as an extra day with extra opportunities!  This day only comes once every four years; why not make the best of it?

Put in a little extra effort to smile and be productive.  Spend a little extra time with your loved ones.  Buy a little something extra, just for yourself.  And remember that this day, just like every other day, is a gift!

What will you do with your extra day?

 

How to Grow Mushrooms

growing mushrooms

There’s no need to be in the dark about growing mushrooms. These tasty chameleons of the food world are fat-free, low in calories, and filled with vitamins, antioxidants, and other nutrients.

The keys to growing mushrooms at home are establishing the right growing conditions and acquiring or making mushroom spawn, which is the material used to propagate mushrooms.

How Mushrooms Grow

Mushrooms grow from spores — not seeds — that are so tiny you can’t see individual spores with the naked eye.

Because the spores don’t contain chlorophyll to begin germinating (as seeds do), they rely on substances such as sawdust, grain, wooden plugs, straw, wood chips, or liquid for nourishment. A blend of the spores and these nutrients is called spawn. Spawn performs a bit like the starter needed to make sourdough bread.

The spawn supports the growth of mushrooms’ tiny, white, threadlike roots, called mycelium. The mycelium grows first, before anything that resembles a mushroom pushes through the growing medium.

The spawn itself could grow mushrooms, but you’ll get a lot better mushroom harvest when the spawn is applied to a substrate, or growing medium. Depending on the mushroom type, the substrate might be straw, cardboard, logs, wood chips, or compost with a blend of materials such as straw, corncobs, cotton and cocoa seed hulls, gypsum, and nitrogen supplements.

Where to Grow Mushrooms

Mushrooms prefer dark, cool, moist, and humid growing environments. In a house, a basement is often ideal, but a spot under the sink may be all you need.

Test the proposed location by checking the temperature. Most mushrooms grow best in temperatures between 55 and 60 degrees F, away from drying, direct heat and drafts. Enoki mushrooms prefer cooler temperatures, about 45 degrees F. Many basements are too warm in summer to grow mushrooms, so you might consider growing mushrooms as a winter project.

Mushrooms can tolerate some light, but the spot you choose should stay relatively dark or in low light.

Some mushroom types grow outdoors in prepared ground or logs, a process that takes much longer (six months to three years) than in controlled environments inside.

Types of Mushrooms to Grow

There are many kinds of mushrooms. One of the beauties of growing your own instead of wild-harvesting them is that you can be sure you’re not picking a poisonous mushroom.

mushroom types

These mushrooms are the types most commonly grown at home:

  • Crimini
  • Enoki
  • Maitake
  • Portobello
  • Oyster
  • Shiitake
  • White button

Each type has specific growing needs. Grow white button mushrooms on composted manure, shiitakes on wood or hardwood sawdust, and oyster mushrooms on straw, for example.

Growing Mushrooms

If you are growing mushrooms in your home, you have a couple of options for materials.

You can buy mushroom kits already packed with a growing medium that’s inoculated with mushroom spawn. Buying a kit is a good way to begin your knowledge of mushroom growing. If you start without a kit, the type of mushroom you choose to grow determines the substrate you grow the mushrooms on. Research each mushroom’s needs.

button mushrooms

Button mushrooms are among the easiest types to grow. Use 14 x 16 inch trays about 6 inches deep that resemble seed flats. Fill the trays with the mushroom compost material and inoculate with spawn.

Use a heating pad to raise the soil temperature to about 70 degrees F for about three weeks or until you see the mycelium — the tiny, threadlike roots. At this point, drop the temperature to 55 to 60 degrees F. Cover the spawn with an inch or so of potting soil.

Keep the soil moist by spritzing it with water and covering it with a damp cloth that you can spritz with water as it dries.

Button mushrooms should appear within three to four weeks. Harvest them when the caps open and the stalk can be cut with a sharp knife from the stem. Avoid pulling up the mushrooms, or you risk damage to surrounding fungi that are still developing. Harvesting every day should result in a continuous crop for about six months.

Eat Lafayette – Gator Cove

gator cove

If you are looking for a restaurant that perfectly captures the taste and feel of South Louisiana, you have to check out Gator Cove! Gator Cove is 100% Louisiana, combining delicious Cajun food with an exciting atmosphere filled with gators, deer and peacocks. Gator Cove gives its patrons a taste of what Cajun country really is.

The building in which Gator Cove resides was initially built in the early 80s as a garage.  Aubrey and Bonnie Henderson built the garage to house their Bluebird bus; however, the screeching of metal upon metal as Mr. Henderson tried to park the bus proved that the garage wasn’t tall enough for the bus.

The Hendersons had to find a new purpose for their garage.  Since they already owned a barbecue lodge, they decided to expand their business.  In 1982, Gator Cove was opened up in the Henderson’s garage.  Since then, both the building and the menu have grown to accommodate larger and larger crowds hungry for some Cajun cookin’.

As a homestyle restaurant, Gator Cove caters to all things Louisiana, specializing in barbecue, fresh seafood, crawfish, succulent steaks, po’ boys, and more! The menu has something to please the entire family, including plate lunches, children’s dishes, and an assortment of delicious desserts. A full catering menu and party rooms are also available for those hosting parties or other special events.

Gator Cove, like all local seafood restaurants, is booming with business this crawfish season, but mud bugs aren’t the only thing bringing in customers.  It’s the entire Cajun menu, the fun and welcoming atmosphere, and the friendly service that Gator Cove has to offer.  Stop by for lunch or dinner and see what Gator Cove has in store for you!