Category Archives: Photos

Sugarcane Harvesting Time in South Louisiana: Be Careful on the Roads

Sugarcane burning and cutting season has begun in South Louisiana. For the next few weeks, our skies will be smoky and our roads muddy (when we get rain). I just want to remind everyone to be careful if you are driving on country roads as visibility is sometimes reduced near burning/cutting site, the roads can be slippery, and we have to share the roads with the slow moving cane trucks.

Sugarcane farmers burning cane before cutting and harvesting

Farmers burn the sugarcane before cutting it because it reduces transportation and processing costs. The burning removes much of the leafy material around the cane, including the tops, that produces little to no sugar.

The sugarcane industry in Louisiana is the oldest and most historic in the country. Sugarcane was brought here in 1751 by the Jesuit priests and by 1795, granulated sugar was produced on a commercial scale by Etienne deBore at Audubon Park in New Orleans.

Today, some 30,000+ people are employed by the sugarcane industry in Louisiana and approximately 450,000 acres in 25 of our 64 parishes are used for its production.

If you are looking for sugarcane farmland in Acadiana, send me an email. I might just be able to help!

Memorial of 9-11 in Downtown Lafayette

Below is the post I did last year on this day about the 9-11 memorial that we have here downtown Lafayette. If you haven’t been or haven’t noticed before, looks like today will be a beautiful day for a stroll downtown.

———-

I was not going to write anything about 9-11 today, mostly because every one is, and like me, many of you are probably feeling in 9-11 information overload. That said, I received an email from a friend this afternoon who reminded me about the memorial we have here in downtown Lafayette. It just so happen that I wasn’t far from it so I decided to go and take a picture.

Memorial for 9-11 in downtown Lafayette

These are beams that were salvaged from the World Trade Center standing tall and oriented  like the original towers were in New York. The base is pentagonal in shape and includes limestone masonry salvaged from the Pentagon (it is also oriented like the actual Pentagon). On each tower are plaques with the times there were struck and the times they fell. In the base is also the time the Pentagon was struck. The beams are 13 1/2 feet tall and both the beams and the pentagonal base are at a 1/100th scale of the original structures.

If you want to see it, it is located in the corner of Parc Sans Souci in Downtown Lafayette at the intersection of Congress and Polk Street.

Grande Digue Lighthouse and Picking your Neighbors

My daughter and I went driving around yesterday in search of a couple of lighthouses near Shédiac in New Brunswick. This one is in Grande Digue, a small community along the coast just north of Shédiac.

Phare de Grande Digue au Nouveau Brunswick

This particular lighthouse is not open to the public and is a working lighthouse. The road leading to it is a gravel/grass right of way. It made me feel like I was driving on someone’s property.

Phare de Grand Digue au Nouveau Brunswick

After a few minutes there, we met Jody. She owns the little house seen here and lives right next to it. She told me that when the owner of this home died, she purchased it because she didn’t want someone buying the property to build a large home on the coast and block her view. I say good thinking. Buying property around yours is indeed the best way to pick your neighbors.

Jody rents the little cottage to tourists between June and September and she always keeps an eye on the lighthouse.

We can hardly see it in the picture but there is a clothes’ line hanging from the house to the lighthouse, which I thought was pretty cool. I don’t know about you but the thought of hanging my clothes on a lighthouse by the sea for a few days is very appealing to me. Send me an email if you want to get in touch with Jody.

 

 

Clam Digging: A Family Tradition

Something needs to be said about looking for holes in the sand on a deserted beach at low tide and then digging clams for your supper. I’m not sure what, though, except perhaps that I love digging them just about as much as I love eating them.

Ramasser des coques à Shemogue au Nouveau Brunswick

Clam digging in Shemogue New Brunswick is a family tradition for us. When I was growing up, we would come to Shédiac every summer to visit with my mother’s parents and siblings and clam digging is one of the things we always did. Back then, we had 3 generations of Richard folks on the beach because my grand father always came and there were usually a few of us kids mostly fooling around on the beach, playing in the mud.

Ramasser des coques à Shemogue au Nouveau Brusnwick

Our family has been going to the same beach in Shemogue (New Brunswick) for 60+ years now; my mother remembers going there with her parents and siblings when she was growing up. No telling how far back the tradition actually goes.

These pictures were taken yesterday. These are my parents with the yellow bucket and some friends from Quebec who joined us on the campground this week. While our crowd is much smaller when we go clam digging these days, the meal we have later is just as good. And we still had 3 generations of Richard descendents on the beach with my daughter mostly playing in the mud while we dig.

We had a great meal last night and enough leftovers to cook a clam chowder today. Yummy and free. It hardly gets any better than this. Today, we may go for oysters and mussels in the same fashion just on a different beach. Care to join us?

Category Archives: Photos

Sugarcane Harvesting Time in South Louisiana: Be Careful on the Roads

Sugarcane burning and cutting season has begun in South Louisiana. For the next few weeks, our skies will be smoky and our roads muddy (when we get rain). I just want to remind everyone to be careful if you are driving on country roads as visibility is sometimes reduced near burning/cutting site, the roads can be slippery, and we have to share the roads with the slow moving cane trucks.

Sugarcane farmers burning cane before cutting and harvesting

Farmers burn the sugarcane before cutting it because it reduces transportation and processing costs. The burning removes much of the leafy material around the cane, including the tops, that produces little to no sugar.

The sugarcane industry in Louisiana is the oldest and most historic in the country. Sugarcane was brought here in 1751 by the Jesuit priests and by 1795, granulated sugar was produced on a commercial scale by Etienne deBore at Audubon Park in New Orleans.

Today, some 30,000+ people are employed by the sugarcane industry in Louisiana and approximately 450,000 acres in 25 of our 64 parishes are used for its production.

If you are looking for sugarcane farmland in Acadiana, send me an email. I might just be able to help!

Memorial of 9-11 in Downtown Lafayette

Below is the post I did last year on this day about the 9-11 memorial that we have here downtown Lafayette. If you haven’t been or haven’t noticed before, looks like today will be a beautiful day for a stroll downtown.

———-

I was not going to write anything about 9-11 today, mostly because every one is, and like me, many of you are probably feeling in 9-11 information overload. That said, I received an email from a friend this afternoon who reminded me about the memorial we have here in downtown Lafayette. It just so happen that I wasn’t far from it so I decided to go and take a picture.

Memorial for 9-11 in downtown Lafayette

These are beams that were salvaged from the World Trade Center standing tall and oriented  like the original towers were in New York. The base is pentagonal in shape and includes limestone masonry salvaged from the Pentagon (it is also oriented like the actual Pentagon). On each tower are plaques with the times there were struck and the times they fell. In the base is also the time the Pentagon was struck. The beams are 13 1/2 feet tall and both the beams and the pentagonal base are at a 1/100th scale of the original structures.

If you want to see it, it is located in the corner of Parc Sans Souci in Downtown Lafayette at the intersection of Congress and Polk Street.

Grande Digue Lighthouse and Picking your Neighbors

My daughter and I went driving around yesterday in search of a couple of lighthouses near Shédiac in New Brunswick. This one is in Grande Digue, a small community along the coast just north of Shédiac.

Phare de Grande Digue au Nouveau Brunswick

This particular lighthouse is not open to the public and is a working lighthouse. The road leading to it is a gravel/grass right of way. It made me feel like I was driving on someone’s property.

Phare de Grand Digue au Nouveau Brunswick

After a few minutes there, we met Jody. She owns the little house seen here and lives right next to it. She told me that when the owner of this home died, she purchased it because she didn’t want someone buying the property to build a large home on the coast and block her view. I say good thinking. Buying property around yours is indeed the best way to pick your neighbors.

Jody rents the little cottage to tourists between June and September and she always keeps an eye on the lighthouse.

We can hardly see it in the picture but there is a clothes’ line hanging from the house to the lighthouse, which I thought was pretty cool. I don’t know about you but the thought of hanging my clothes on a lighthouse by the sea for a few days is very appealing to me. Send me an email if you want to get in touch with Jody.

 

 

Clam Digging: A Family Tradition

Something needs to be said about looking for holes in the sand on a deserted beach at low tide and then digging clams for your supper. I’m not sure what, though, except perhaps that I love digging them just about as much as I love eating them.

Ramasser des coques à Shemogue au Nouveau Brunswick

Clam digging in Shemogue New Brunswick is a family tradition for us. When I was growing up, we would come to Shédiac every summer to visit with my mother’s parents and siblings and clam digging is one of the things we always did. Back then, we had 3 generations of Richard folks on the beach because my grand father always came and there were usually a few of us kids mostly fooling around on the beach, playing in the mud.

Ramasser des coques à Shemogue au Nouveau Brusnwick

Our family has been going to the same beach in Shemogue (New Brunswick) for 60+ years now; my mother remembers going there with her parents and siblings when she was growing up. No telling how far back the tradition actually goes.

These pictures were taken yesterday. These are my parents with the yellow bucket and some friends from Quebec who joined us on the campground this week. While our crowd is much smaller when we go clam digging these days, the meal we have later is just as good. And we still had 3 generations of Richard descendents on the beach with my daughter mostly playing in the mud while we dig.

We had a great meal last night and enough leftovers to cook a clam chowder today. Yummy and free. It hardly gets any better than this. Today, we may go for oysters and mussels in the same fashion just on a different beach. Care to join us?